South Florida Cities Increase Gator Warnings After Disney Tragedy

South Florida cities are amping up their efforts to prevent fatal alligator attacks like the one that occurred in Orlando’s Walt Disney World when an alligator emerged from a lagoon, grabbed a toddler wading in ankle-deep water and killed him.

From Oakland Park to Delray Beach, cities have begun replacing “no swimming” signs with stronger warnings on lakes and canals where alligators and snakes might lurk.

Florida does not regulate whether cities or counties need warning signs.

Delray Beach is taking no chances. The city, which currently has only a few “no swimming” signs, plans to install 20 signs that warn of alligators at eight canals and lakes.

So are Oakland Park, North Lauderdale and Parkland, where staff are adding warning signs at parks by water.

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission numbers, there were nine alligator attacks in 2015, one of which was fatal, and 10 in 2014, none of which were fatal. Since 2006, there have been five reported fatalities due to alligator attacks. There have been 23 reported attacks since 1948, when the agency began keeping track.

Living in Florida, we know the dangers of alligators in any body of water, as well as hotels, golf courses and even backyards. Most public places located near bodies of water are pretty vigilant about relocating dangerous animals out of these areas. The added signage going up in south Florida is great, as it could prevent another tragedy from occurring.

Hotels, resorts and other public places have a duty to keep their premises free of any dangers, including violent wildlife. If you have any questions about a premises liability claim, our Florida Premises Liability Lawyers at Whittel & Melton can help. Call us today at 866-608-5529 or contact us online.

Contact Information