Articles Posted in Amusement Park Injury

The Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has opened an investigation into why a roller coaster derailed at an amusement park Thursday night in Daytona Beach.

The accident on the Sand Blaster ride at the Daytona Beach Boardwalk sent two riders plunging 34 feet to the ground and left two others dangling in one of the ride’s cars, according to the Daytona Beach Fire Department.

Four riders, all of whom were on the same car, and two others were rushed to Halifax Health Medical Center in Daytona Beach. A hospital official said information about their condition might be released sometime Friday.

Later Friday, the hospital said it “received nine patients.”

The Sand Blaster has been operating at Daytona Beach since 2013 after the 40-year-old ride was bought from a closed amusement park in Delaware a year earlier.

Thrill seekers and adventurists flock to roller coasters for an adrenaline rush. However, a roller coaster is one of the most dangerous rides at amusement parks. Each year there are an estimated 9,000 emergency room visits that stem from amusement park and roller coaster injuries.

While amusement park rides undergo extensive testing and regular inspections to ensure that they are safe, accidents can still happen, and when they do they can result in serious personal injury or wrongful death.

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A tourist is suing Sea World, claiming their negligence led to injuries.

The woman filed a complaint April 18 in Orange County Circuit Court against Sea World of Florida LLC, doing business as Sea World, and Sea World LLC, alleging the company failed to reduce, minimize or eliminate foreseeable risks before they manifested themselves as dangerous conditions on the premises.

According to the complaint, on May 17, 2014, the woman was legally on the Sea World premises in Orlando as a customer when she slipped, tripped and fell on poorly maintained flooring.

As a result, the woman says she sustained bodily injury resulting in pain and suffering, permanent aggravation of a pre-existing condition, plus the expenses of hospitalization, and medical and nursing care and treatment.

She also accused Sea World of failing to warn anyone of the dangerous condition as well as failing to properly provide training to its employees regarding the proper maintenance and inspection of floors, so as to prevent a danger to a guest.

Large amusement parks like Sea World are no stranger to personal injury lawsuits. In fact, many have involved slip and falls, trip and falls and other premises liability issues. Filing a lawsuit against an amusement park is similar to filing suit against any other party: an injury occurs, a suit is filed, an investigation into the claims is conducted and a trial is held if no settlement can be reached.

Big companies like Sea World have a legal duty to keep their premises safe and free from foreseeable accidents. This includes a constant safety sweep of the grounds as well as proper training, screening and supervision of staff. When amusement parks fall short of this responsibility, they may be held liable for their negligence by victims through personal injury lawsuits. Victims may be able to recover for their medical bills, hospital expenses, lost wages from missing work, physical pain and suffering, and mental anguish.

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A Polk County woman is suing a Disney theme park, alleging breach of duty and negligence led to her injuries.

The woman filed a complaint April 10 in Orange County Circuit Court against Walt Disney Parks and Resorts U.S. Inc,. alleging failure to exercise reasonable care for the safety of the public.

According to the complaint, on Nov. 9, 2017, the woman visited the Magic Kingdom theme park with her family to attend Mickey’s Very Merry Christmas Party, which included a fireworks show. She alleges that during the event there were employees who were walking at a very rapid pace and were zigzagging through the overcrowded venue in a negligent manner. The suit says the Disney employees ran into the woman, knocking her down.

She says she sustained bodily injury, resulting in pain and suffering, disability, disfigurement and expense of hospitalization, medical and nursing care and treatment.

The suit alleges Walt Disney Parks and Resorts U.S. failed to train and/or inadequately train its employees regarding safe maneuvering through the park when it is crowded and/or overcrowded so that employees do not make contact with guests and cause injury.

As an invitee of the park, you are considered a guest, which means you have a right to be reasonably protected against any safety risk while in the park under Florida’s premises liability law. Failure on the park’s part to protect you or anyone else may be considered negligence. An experienced Florida Amusement Park Injury Attorney at Whittel & Melton can investigate the matter of negligence for you and help you understand what steps to follow to seek financial compensation for pain and suffering.

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An 18-year-old Ohio man was killed Wednesday evening when the Fire Ball ride he was on at the Ohio State Fair broke apart in mid-air, the Ohio State Highway Patrol said.

Seven people were also injured in the incident.

The victims were transported to local hospitals and at least three are in critical condition.

According to amusement ride operator Amusements of America, the Fire Ball swings riders 40 feet into the air while spinning them at 13 revolutions per minute.

Fair officials said that rides will remain closed as safety inspections continue, and those who purchased wristbands can receive refunds.

KMG International B.V., the Netherlands-based ride manufacturer, said in a statement, “Our deepest sympathies go out to all who were involved or affected by this tragic accident. We are currently gathering information on the accident and investigating the cause and circumstances of the accident.”

The operators of “Fireball” and similar rides are instructed to stop operations until further notice, the statement added.

An official with the Ohio State Highway Patrol said its investigators have been at the scene since the deadly incident was reported at 7:24 p.m. Wednesday.

The Ohio Department of Agriculture’s chief inspector of amusement ride safety said inspectors have been present at the fair since last Wednesday. An inspection of the Fire Ball would include evaluating connections and hydraulics.The Fire Ball had apparently been inspected three to four times over the previous two days.

Wednesday marked the first day of the fair, which is scheduled to run through Aug. 6, according to the fair’s website.

Other similar rides throughout the country are being shut down as a precaution.

The Monmouth County Fair in New Jersey immediately shut down a ride similar to the Ohio State Fair’s Fire Ball. A similar ride at the Orange County Fair in California was also shut down to undergo a re-inspection after the Ohio incident.

North American Midway Entertainment, which is not a provider of the Ohio State Fair rides, said in a statement that “due to the tragic incident… we will keep all our Fire Ball rides closed until further notice from the manufacturer for precautionary safety measures.”

The Indiana State Fairgrounds & Event Center said, “Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone impacted by the tragic accident at the Ohio State Fair. As the investigation into the cause of this accident continues, the Indiana State Fair and North American Midway Entertainment have made the decision to not operate the Fireball at the 2017 Indiana State Fair.”

The Illinois Department of Labor said it is also suspending the operation of all rides similar to the Fire Ball until further notice.

There is a lot of pressure placed on state fairs and carnivals to get rides set up in a short amount of time. Because of this time constraint, those setting up can neglect what matters the most – keeping people safe.

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Central Florida theme parks have submitted their injury reports for the second quarter of 2017.

There were a total of 16 illnesses or injuries that required a hospital stay of 24 hours, according to the state’s quarterly report.

Walt Disney World reported 11 incidents, while Universal Orlando had four and SeaWorld Orlando had one.

The incidents ranged from seizures to back pain.The injuries and illnesses happened between April and June.

At Disney’s Animal Kingdom, a 31-year-old woman felt dizzy and lost consciousness on the park’s newest attraction, Flight of Passage. On June 12, a 79-year-old woman with a pre-existing condition also became ill after being on the ride.

An 81-year-old woman had motion sickness on Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey in April. An 18-year-old woman had a similar illness on Harry Potter and the Forbidden Journey.

Other incidents reported:

Disney World

  • A 57-year-old woman with a pre-existing condition experienced stroke-like symptoms on Castaway Creek at Disney’s Typhoon Lagoon.
  • A 48-year-old woman with a pre-existing condition had a seizure on Seven Dwarfs Mine Train at the Magic Kingdom in May.
  • A 34-year-old man reported eye irritation on Expedition Everest at Disney’s Animal Kingdom.

Universal Orlando

  • A 47-year-old woman fainted on the Incredible Hulk Coaster at Universal’s Islands of Adventure on June 20.
  • A 45-year-old man reported back pain on the Kala & Tai Nui Serpentine Body Slides at Universal’s Volcano Bay.

SeaWorld Orlando

  • A 54-year-old man reported a shock to his arm on Journey to Atlantis on June 15.

No incidents were reported by Legoland Florida or Busch Gardens Tampa Bay.

An outing at Disney World, a county fair or any of the amusement parks around Florida should be a day filled with fun and excitement. However, an amusement park injury can turn a great day into a nightmare in just a matter of seconds.

If you have been injured at an amusement or theme park, it is very important for you to contact an experienced injury lawyer before signing any documents or making any statements to a park owner or representative. The park’s initial offer will not likely cover certain necessary damages, such as ongoing medical needs or future losses.

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Nearly two dozen visitors to Six Flags America in Bowie, Maryland, were stuck on a roller coaster when it stalled Thursday.

A spokesman for Prince George’s County Fire Department said firefighters rescued all riders on board the Joker’s Jinx coaster four hours after crews arrived to rescue them.

Six Flags issued a statement about the incident:

Joker’s Jinx did not complete its regular ride cycle causing it to stop at a safe location on the track. The Prince George’s County Fire Department is onsite to assist in getting the riders safely off the ride. The safety of our guests is our highest priority and the ride will be closed for a thorough inspection before re-opening.

The ride has had this problem before when it became stuck in 2014. The rescue took hours.

Roller coasters, while thrilling, are the most dangerous rides at amusement and theme parks. Each year, roller coaster and theme park injuries account for 9,000 emergency room visits.

If an amusement park’s negligence results in an accident, whether it be a roller coaster stalling or a slip and fall accident, injury victims may be entitled to financial compensation from the amusement park owners for their suffering.

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Police have reported that a teenage girl riding a Universal Orlando amusement park ride suffered burns after an electronic cigarette belonging to another rider exploded and shot a fireball at her.

Police believe that the 14-year-old girl from Tennessee was riding the Hogwarts Express train Saturday with her family when an e-cigarette belonging to a rider in another group blew up in his pocket and the fireball hit her in the face and elsewhere.

The explosion wasn’t big, but scared everyone on the train, according to reports.

The girl was taken to the hospital with mild to moderate burns to her face, arm and leg. The man suffered minor injuries.

An e-cigarette, also known as a vape, is an electronic nicotine delivery system that produces a heated vapor that resembles smoke. They have been for sale in the United States since 2007. E-cigarettes are now used by more than 2.5 million people in the U.S.

If you were burned by an exploding e-cigarette or vape, you could have a legitimate claim against the manufacturers of the vape device and battery, and perhaps other parties. What this means is that you could file a personal injury claim for monetary damages for:

  • Medical expenses
  • Pain and suffering
  • Lost wages
  • Loss of quality of life
  • Disfigurement
  • Emotional & mental anguish

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A boy has fallen from a classic wooden roller coaster at a western Pennsylvania amusement park.

A spokesman for Idlewild and SoakZone amusement park says the child fell from the ride Thursday afternoon.

A Westmoreland County emergency dispatcher says the child was conscious and airlifted to Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh, about 50 miles west.

A park spokesman said he doesn’t know the boy’s condition or where he was on the ride when he fell. It is unknown whether the ride malfunctioned or if horseplay was involved.

The Roller Coaster opened in 1938 and takes riders up, down and around a wooded hillside. It doesn’t require seat belts, and children under 4 feet tall must be accompanied by an adult.

The accident comes four days after a 10-year-old boy was decapitated as he rode a water slide at a Kansas water park.

Roller coasters are enjoyed by children, adults and all thrill seekers, but what you may not know is that coasters are the most dangerous rides at an amusement or theme park. In recent years, more than 10,000 people have been treated in emergency rooms throughout the United States due to amusement park and roller coaster injuries. If a roller coaster accident, like a fall from the ride, was caused by negligence, an injury victim may be entitled to compensation from the owners of the park.

Roller coasters have various speeds, height, intensity, size, G-force, etc. Children are the most susceptible to injuries from a roller coaster mostly because of the amount of G-forces a body can tolerate at high speeds. All bodies react differently from intense G-forces, so where one person may walk away unscathed, another person could suffer back injuries, neck injuries, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, blood clots and wrongful death. Roller coaster seat belt systems can also cause injuries to riders depending on the differences in height, weight and size. Another issue, as this case highlights, is the risk of falling out of coasters from extreme heights.

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A 10-year-old boy was decapitated as he rode a 168-foot tall waterslide at a waterpark in Kansas Sunday.

The boy was decapitated on the “Verruckt” raft ride at the Schlitterbahn WaterPark in Kansas City, Kansas.

The boy was in a raft with two women who were not related to him when he was killed. The women were treated for facial injuries.

The Guinness World Records has certified the ride as the tallest in the world.

At least two people who recently rode on “Verruckt” — German for “insane” — have said the nylon shoulder straps came loose during the ride. It is not clear at this time if the straps played any role in the boy’s death.

The park said Tuesday that “Verruckt” will be closed for the rest of the season.

“Verruckt” riders sit in multi-person rafts that begin with a steep drop, followed by a surge up a second hill before a 50-foot descent to a finishing pool. Each “Verruckt” rider must be at least 54 inches tall, and the combined body weight of the riders on each raft is limited to 400 to 550 pounds.

Riders are harnessed in with two nylon seatbelt-like straps — one that crosses the rider’s lap, the other stretching diagonally like a car shoulder seat belt. Each strap is held in place by long Velcro-style straps. Riders also hang on to ropes inside the raft.

Schlitterbahn in Kansas City has been sued for negligence at least three times, all in 2014, although none of those legal actions involved the waterslide.

Water parks, for the most part, provide fun and entertainment to thousands of people a day. However, they are sometimes the scene of serious accidents, like slip, trip and falls and drownings. As this case shows, people can be injured or tragically killed at water parks.

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A 2-year-old boy was snatched off the beach by an alligator on Wednesday at a Disney World Resort.

His body was recovered around 3:30 today. The body was taken to Orange County Medical Examiner’s Office. It is believed that the gator drowned the boy.

The 7- to 8-foot reptile grabbed the boy late Tuesday as he was playing in about a foot of water at the Seven Seas Lagoon at the Grand Floridian Hotel. His father, who quickly rushed to the boy’s aid, could not fend off the alligator and received minor injuries to his hand.

The boy’s mother also rushed into the water, but when the couple was unable to save their son, they alerted a nearby lifeguard who called 911.

Some 50 wildlife specialists, including trained alligator trappers, shifted early Wednesday from a search and rescue effort to a recovery operation, according to the Orange County Sheriff’s Office.

A tragedy like this is not something we read about often in the news, but sadly, things like this can happen in Florida.

According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission numbers, as of April there has been just one other incident where a person was bitten by an alligator in Florida in 2016. There were nine 2015, one of which was fatal, and 10 in 2014, none of which were fatal. Since 2006, there have been five reported fatalities due to alligator attacks, and since 1948, when the agency began keeping track, there have been 23.

Any body of water of any size in Florida can potentially have alligators in them. Most hotels and resorts near bodies of water are pretty vigilant about relocating dangerous animals out of areas where the public would be nearby. In Florida, you have to be very careful as alligators can be anywhere, including golf courses and even backyards.

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